A severe test of interpersonal theory of depression among criminal defendants

Thomas E. Joiner, Jr.1, David Lane Brown2, Alan R. Felthous2, Ernest P. Barratt2, Laurie A. Brown3
1Florida State University, United States
2University of Texas Medical Branch At Galveston, United States
3University of Houston at Clear Lake, United States
Cite this article:  Joiner, Jr., T. E., Lane Brown, D., Felthous, A. R., Barratt, E. P., & Brown, L. A. (1998). A severe test of interpersonal theory of depression among criminal defendants. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 26(1), 23-28.

Volume 26 Issue 1 | e904 | Published: February 1998 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1998.26.1.23

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact
We tested Coyne’s (1976) interpersonal theory of depression using a highly specialized psychiatric sample (76 criminal defendants referred for psychiatric evaluation). We assessed whether mood-disordered participants scored lower on an index of social contact than nondepressed participants. Consistent with interpersonal theory, depressed participants obtained lower scores on the social contact measure than nondepressed participants – to our knowledge, the first results to support the diagnostic specificity component of Coyne’s theory among a clinical sample. Number of comorbid diagnoses was not significantly related to social contact. It appears that Coyne’s theory possesses explanatory power, even when subjected to a relatively severe empirical test.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.