Suicidal ideation among the elderly: Personal variables, stress and social support

Maria Mireault1, Anton F. De Man2
1Concordia University, Canada
2Bishop's University, Canada
Cite this article:  Mireault, M., & De Man, A. F. (1996). Suicidal ideation among the elderly: Personal variables, stress and social support. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 24(4), 385-392.

Volume 24 Issue 4 | e854 | Published: November 1996 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1996.24.4.385

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact
Fifty-three elderly men and 51 elderly women participated in a study of the relationship between suicidal ideation and selected personal, stress, and social support variables. A multifactor theory formed the basis for the selection of variables, which included age, gender, marital status, living arrangements, perceived religiousness, alcohol use, self-esteem, depression, negative stress, satisfaction with health, social isolation, and satisfaction with social support. Bivariate correlation analyses found suicidal ideation to be related to infrequent alcohol consumption, high depression, high social isolation, and dissatisfaction with health and social support. Results of a multiple regression analysis identified (dis)satisfaction with social support, gender, living arrangements, and (in)frequency of alcohol use as significant predictors.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.