Self-esteem, gender, and the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being

Yuan Li1, Jijun Lan1, Chengting Ju1
1School of Psychology, Shaanxi Normal University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Li, Y., Lan, J., & Ju, C. (2015). Self-esteem, gender, and the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 43(8), 1243-1254.

Volume 43 Issue 8 | e4497 | Published: September 2015 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2015.43.8.1243–1254

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We examined the moderating effects of self-esteem and gender on the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being in Chinese university students. Participants were 542 students (217 men, 325 women; age range = 17–24 years), who completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the extraversion subscale of the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, and the General Well-Being Schedule to evaluate self-esteem, extraversion, and subjective well-being, respectively. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that self-esteem moderated the association between extraversion and subjective well-being. Among students high in self-esteem, those with high extraversion had higher subjective well-being than did those with low extraversion. Across all participants (high- and low-extraversion groups), subjective well-being was low when self-esteem was low. Gender moderated the link between extraversion and subjective well-being, tending to be a more significant determinant of subjective well-being in men than in women.

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