Inferred adult personality as a function of sex and sex-role behavior in childhood

Steven J. Gilbert1, Lin Stephan2
1State University of New York, United States
2The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, United States
Cite this article:  Gilbert, S. J., & Stephan, L. (1984). Inferred adult personality as a function of sex and sex-role behavior in childhood. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 12(1), 23-28.

Volume 12 Issue 1 | e423 | Published: February 1984 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1984.12.1.23

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact
In two studies subjects read descriptions of stereotypic masculine or feminine behavior displayed by a 7 year old boy or girl, and then predicted personality attributes likely to be evident 15 years later. Derrogation of the masculine female and the feminine male was expected, but not found. Results showed, instead, that irrespective of sex, the feminine (vs. masculine) child was judged to be happier, more mature, and less self-centered, as well as more expressively and less instrumentally oriented as an adult. Results are discussed in terms of methodology and socio-cultural factors.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.