Gaze and distance as a function of changes in interpersonal gaze

Frank W. Schneider1, Christine Hansvick1
1University of Windsor, Canada
Cite this article:  Schneider, F. W., & Hansvick, C. (1977). Gaze and distance as a function of changes in interpersonal gaze. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 5(1), 49-54.

Volume 5 Issue 1 | e168 | Published: February 1977 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1977.5.1.49

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Subjects were exposed to one of two patterns of confederate gaze: either he gazed at, then away from their eyes, or he gazed away, then at their eyes. The subjects' distance was unaffected by the gaze pattern, and they visually reciprocated the confederate's gaze direction. The results are interpreted as failing to support Argyle and Dean's compensation hypothesis. Also, amount of gaze decreased with time, and, relative to males, females gazed more and were more responsive to changes in the confederate's gaze direction.
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