Sense of self in the new millennium: Male and female student responses to the TST

Sherry L. Grace1, Kenneth L. Cramer2
1University Health Network Women's Program, Canada
2University of Windsor, Canada
Cite this article:  Grace, S., & Cramer, K. (2002). Sense of self in the new millennium: Male and female student responses to the TST. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 30, 271-280.

Volume 30 Issue 3 | e1169 | Published: May 2002 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2002.30.3.271

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The Twenty Statements Test (TST) measures how an individual locates the self within a social system, while providing an index of differentially organized self-related information across individuals. The TST was utilized to follow changes in North American self-conceptions from the early 1950s to the 1990s. The purpose of this study was to assess sense of self among 324 millennial undergraduate students using the four-referential frame coding scheme. Results supported the hypothesis that students represent their sense of self as primarily C mode (or reflective). There were no gender differences in social self-description. Findings are discussed in terms of comparative data, gender differences, and sociohistorical context.
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