Exploring gender stereotypes about interpersonal behavior and personality factors using digital matched-guise techniques

Inga Dennhag1, Anders Steinvall2, Camilla Hakelind3, Mats Deutschmann4
1Department of Clinical Science, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Umeå University, Sweden
2Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, Sweden
3Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden
4School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
Cite this article:  Dennhag, I., Steinvall, A., Hakelind, C., & Deutschmann, M. (2019). Exploring gender stereotypes about interpersonal behavior and personality factors using digital matched-guise techniques. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 47, e8150.

Volume 47 Issue 8 | e8150 | Published: August 2019 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.8150

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We explored gender stereotypes among Swedish university students (N = 101) who were studying a course in psychology, using a matched-guise experimental design. The gender identity of a speaker in a dialogue, manifested by voice, was digitally manipulated to sound male or female. Responses to the recordings indicated that a speaker with a male voice was rated as significantly less conscientious, agreeable, extraverted, and open to experience than was the same speaker with a female voice. Regarding social behavior, there was a tendency for the speaker with a male voice to be rated as more hostile than was the same speaker with a female voice. The study findings suggest that stereotype effects, rather than real behavioral differences, may have an impact on perceived gender differences.

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