Situational pressure, attitudes toward blacks, and laboratory aggression

Knud S. Larsen1, Leonard Colen1, Doug Von Flue1, Paul Zimmerman1
1Oregan State University, United States
Cite this article:  Larsen, K. S., Colen, L., Von Flue, D., & Zimmerman, P. (1974). Situational pressure, attitudes toward blacks, and laboratory aggression. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 2(2), 219-221.

Volume 2 Issue 2 | e79 | Published: August 1974 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1974.2.2.219

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The importance of the situational context in producing discriminatory behavior cannot he overlooked. This experiment on laboratory aggression investigated the effect of racial attitudes on the willingness to shock a black victim. A second purpose was to compare 2 groups in the shock levels administered to a black or
a white victim. The results showed that attitudes toward blacks are not related to the level of shock administered to blacks. A black victim is shocked less than a white victim. This discriminatory behavior can be understood as a function of the social pressures of the university community as influenced, for example, by the affirmative action programs.

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