Punishment history and adult attitudes towards violence and aggression in men and women

Daniel Macintyre1, Peggy J. Cantrell1
1East Tennessee State University, United States
Cite this article:  Macintyre, D., & Cantrell, P. J. (1995). Punishment history and adult attitudes towards violence and aggression in men and women. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 23(1), 23-28.

Volume 23 Issue 1 | e777 | Published: February 1995 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1995.23.1.23

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Some sociological and psychological theories view physical punishment as a form of violence which promotes violent behavior and attitudes in children. However, it is used by 90% of American parents. The long-term impact of such widespread reliance on physical punishment on children's lives is largely speculative, as there is a paucity of empirical research in this area. The current study examines reported types of punishment during childhood and adult attitudes towards violence and interpersonal aggression. Differences in men and women are also examined. Two hundred and forty college students participated. Men and women reported different histories of punishment type, and differed in attitudes towards violence and interpersonal aggression. No relationship was found between punishment history and current attitudes towards violence and interpersonal aggression.
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