Effect of gender dominance expectancies for knowledge on self-touching during conversations

Marian Morry1, Michael E. Enzle1
1University of Alberta, Canada
Cite this article:  Morry, M., & Enzle, M. E. (1994). Effect of gender dominance expectancies for knowledge on self-touching during conversations. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 22(2), 123-130.

Volume 22 Issue 2 | e753 | Published: May 1994 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1994.22.2.123

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We investigated how expectancies about gender dominance for knowledge influence the frequency of self-touching enacted by conversing members of mixed-sex dyads. The study was a 2 (male vs. female dyad member) × 2 (normatively male vs. female knowledge dominance) design. Two alternative hypotheses about the effects of normative expectancies for gender-knowledge dominance on self-touching were evaluated. Normative expectation of knowledge deficiency could provoke greater performance concerns and self-touching than a normative expectation of knowledge dominance, or a normative expectation of knowledge dominance could provoke greater performance concerns and self-touching than a normative expectation of knowledge deficiency. Results supported the latter alternative.

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