Work engagement, tenure, and external opportunities moderate perceived high-performance work systems and affective commitment

Bin Hu1, Zhenhu Hou2, Miranda Chi Kuan Mak3, Sabrina Lingxiao Xu4, Xuhua Yang5, Tianlong Hu6, Yong Qiu7, Yueran Wen8
1School of Management, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, People’s Republic of China
2College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, People’s Republic of China
3Faculty of Education, University of Macau, Macau, Macao
4Durham University Business School, Durham University, United Kingdom
5School of Labor Economics, Capital University of Economics and Business, People’s Republic of China
6School of Finance, Renmin University of China, People’s Republic of China
7Business School, Beijing Technology and Business University, People’s Republic of China
8School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Hu, B., Hou, Z., Mak, M., Xu, S., Yang, X., Hu, T., Qiu, Y., & Wen, Y. (2019). Work engagement, tenure, and external opportunities moderate perceived high-performance work systems and affective commitment. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 47, e7353.

Volume 47 Issue 5 | e7353 | Published: May 2019 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.7353

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We examined the role of our proposed moderators, namely, work engagement, organizational tenure, and perceived external opportunities, in the relationship between perceived high-performance work systems (HPWS) and affective organizational commitment. We conducted a survey with 94 employees of an information technology company in China. The results showed that the effect of perceived HPWS on affective commitment is stronger among employees with longer tenure, and weaker among employees who perceive more external opportunities. The results also showed that the effect of perceived HPWS on affective commitment is stronger at a marginally significant level among employees with stronger work engagement. These findings suggest that organizational managers should pay more attention to individual factors that may change employees’ responses to HPWS, and adopt a more individualized approach to retain talented employees.

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