Ethnic-inspired design consumption as a means of enhancing self-view confidence

Erin Cho1, Chung-Wha (Chloe) Ki2, Youn-Kyung Kim3
1School of Design Strategies, Parsons, The New School for Design, United States
2Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
3Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management, University of Tennessee, United States
Cite this article:  Cho, E., Ki, C.-W. (., & Kim, Y.-K. (2019). Ethnic-inspired design consumption as a means of enhancing self-view confidence. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 47(1), e7286.

Volume 47 Issue 1 | e7286 | Published: January 2019 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.7286

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Understanding of what drives mainstream consumers to purchase ethnic-inspired designs (EID) is lacking, and even less is understood about the self-centric values (personal values and product values) and the goal pursuits (enhancing self-view confidence) they project by consuming EID. We set out to fill this void, using image theory as a conceptual framework on data collected by a marketing research firm from 1,153 women on its female consumer panel. We found that mainstream consumers’ aspirations to enhance self-view confidence (self-enhancement) are a key driver determining their purchase intent toward EID products. We also found that self-enhancement is directly influenced by the product values (perceived aesthetics and novelty) of EID, and the effects of personal values (cultural openness and seeking personal style) on self-enhancement are mediated by product values.

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