Childhood injuries and Erikson's psychosocial stages

Harvey J. Ginsburg1
1Southwest Texas State University, United States
Cite this article:  Ginsburg, H.J (1992). Childhood injuries and Erikson's psychosocial stages. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 20, 95-100.

Volume 20 Issue 2 | e677 | Published: May 1992 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1992.20.2.95

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Childhood injury epidemiologists and injury control researchers commonly use a 40-year-old epidemiologic agent-host-environment model to explain injuries and have not considered the value of placing childhood injuries in the context of general theories of human development. The psychosocial stages elucidated by Erik H. Erikson may be a useful heuristic approach for childhood injury investigators to consider. Examples of common childhood injuries during the first 4 psychosocial stages, trust vs. mistrust, autonomy vs. shame and doubt, initiative vs. guilt and industry vs inferiority are presented to illustrate how Erikson’s theory may be of value in understanding and con-trolling the prevalence of childhood injuries in the United States.


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