Schizotypal thinking among members of occult sects

John Rust1
1University of London, United Kingdom
Cite this article:  Rust, J. (1992). Schizotypal thinking among members of occult sects. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 20, 121-130.

Volume 20 Issue 2 | e673 | Published: May 1992 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1992.20.2.121

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Schizotypal thinking among members of occult groups was investigated using the Rust Inventory of Schizotypal Cognitions (RISC). It was found that the members of almost all sects have atypical scores. However, a discriminant functions analysis of the RISC items among the sects indicated that there were 2 significant functions which differentiated sect members from normals and from each other. This suggested a classification of occult groups into 2 types with respect to cognitive style. Type I cults are characterized by devotion to a divine authority and obedience to its designs, as interpreted by the sect leader. Type II cults are characterized by a shared investigation of magical or paranormal phenomena, usually associated with an idiosyncratic or illogical spiritual philosophy.


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