An examination of the predictive factors of cyberbullying in adolescents

Utku Beyazıt1, Şükran Şimşek2, Aynur Bütün Ayhan3
1Psychology Department, Near East University, Turkey
2Department of Child Development, Ahi Evran University, Turkey
3Department of Child Development, Ankara University, Turkey
Cite this article:  Beyazıt, U., Şimşek, , & Bütün Ayhan, A. (2017). An examination of the predictive factors of cyberbullying in adolescents. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 45(9), 1511-1522.

Volume 45 Issue 9 | e6267 | Published: October 2017 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.6267

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We examined the factors related to predicting cyberbullying behavior in adolescents, specifically demographics and the use of information and communication technologies. The study participants were 417 adolescents attending high school in Kırşehir, Turkey. We used an individual information form and a cyberbullying scale to collect information and found that 149 (35.7%) of the adolescents had cyberbullied others at least once. Hierarchical regression analysis showed in Step 1 that age, gender, grade, father’s age, and family income were significant factors predictive of cyberbullying, and in Step 2 that owning a computer rather than just having access to one in a public library or Internet cafe, parental control of use of the Internet, and previously being bullied on the Internet were significant predictive factors. Based on these findings, we propose that effective strategies for the prevention of cyberbullying are parental supervision of adolescent use of information and communication technologies, education for parents and teachers, and offering information technology communication (media) literacy courses in schools.

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