Self-monitoring and locus of control as determinants of social interaction: A preliminary investigation

P. Nicholas Hamid1
1City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Cite this article:  Hamid, P. N. (1989). Self-monitoring and locus of control as determinants of social interaction: A preliminary investigation. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 17(2), 125-134.

Volume 17 Issue 2 | e580 | Published: August 1989 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1989.17.2.125

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Researchers on the relationship between self-monitoring and locus of control haveconsistently shown low correlations. In this study social cognitive orientations of highand low self-monitors having either an external or internal locus of control throughanalysis of their social interaction patterns were examined. The low correlation betweenself-monitoring and locus of control was upheld while consistent differences emerged between the 4 groups. High self-monitors who were external maintained awide range of numerous contacts while high and low internals preferred a moderate levelof intimate or task related contacts. Low self-monitoring externals clearly maintained arestricted and unsatisfying range of contacts. The results were interpreted as evidencingmotivational differences important for the understanding of the relationship between the2 constructs.
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