Effect of self-efficacy in stereotype activation

Pei Wang1, Pei Zhou2, Cheng-Hao Tan2, Peng-Cheng Zhang3
1School of Psychology, Department of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University and Shanghai Normal University, People’s Republic of China
2Department of Psychology, Shanghai Normal University, People’s Republic of China
3College of Education, Department of Psychology, Nantong University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Wang, P., Zhou, P., Tan, C.-H., & Zhang, P.-C. (2017). Effect of self-efficacy in stereotype activation. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 45(3), 469-476.

Volume 45 Issue 3 | e5201 | Published: April 2017 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.5201

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We examined whether or not self-efficacy plays a role in stereotype-activation effect. We found in Study 1 (N = 46) that compared to being primed with the stereotype of an occupation that required less mental effort (cleaner), participants primed with the stereotype of a highly qualified information technology expert performed better in a general knowledge test. Self-efficacy reliably mediated the effect of stereotype activation on test performance. In Study 2 (N = 46) we found that the group primed with the stereotype of an athlete exhibited greater endurance in a physical test than did those who were primed with the stereotype of a homeless person. These results show that self-efficacy beliefs acted as a mediator in the behavior of the participants.

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