Perceptions of solicited versus unsolicited self-disclosure

Renee Hund1, Kenneth R. Olson1, Robert P. Markley1
1Fort Hays State University, United States
Cite this article:  Hund, R., Olson, K. R., & Markley, R. P. (1986). Perceptions of solicited versus unsolicited self-disclosure. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 14(1), 7-14.

Volume 14 Issue 1 | e489 | Published: February 1986 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1986.14.1.7

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The present investigation examined perception of persons who emitted unsolicited self-disclosure as compared to perception of persons who emitted solicited self-disclosure. Sex differences were also examined. Subjects were 158 undergratuate students who were randomly assigned to listen to one of four audiotapes. The audiotaped vignette consisted of actors emitting either solicited or unsolicited self-disclosure. Subjects rated the actors on social skillfulness, social appropriateness, and interpersonal attraction. Unsolicited self-disclosers were rated as significantly less socially appropriate and interpersonally attractive. A significant interaction effect of disclosure mode by actor sex was also found for social skillfulness. The female was viewed as less socially skillful than the male when she failed to solicit disclosure. Explanations of these findings and their implications are discussed.
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