Occupation and impressions: Stereotypes of males and females in three professions

Wayne H. Decker1
1Salisbury State College, United States
Cite this article:  Decker, W. H. (1986). Occupation and impressions: Stereotypes of males and females in three professions. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 14(1), 69-76.

Volume 14 Issue 1 | e488 | Published: February 1986 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1986.14.1.69

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Stereotypes of persons in 3 professions and of “average persons” were studied. The results suggested an earlier finding is limited in generality, if not an artifact. The pattern of males being perceived as more autonomous and effective but less acceptable than females occurred only when target occupation was unspecified and data of both sexes were combined. Females were generally rated equal or superior to males, although male participants gave average females low ratings. Male participants also rated male nurses as less acceptable than did female participants. Female cross-sex-role occupational behavior was not disapproved. Computer professionals generally scored high on autonomy and effectiveness, but not on acceptability. Liberal education and role modeling were suggested as means of countering negative stereotypes.
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