Subordinate imitation of supervision behavior: The role of supervisor power and subordinate self-esteem

Seymour Adler1
1Stevens Institute of Technology, United States
Cite this article:  Adler, S. (1983). Subordinate imitation of supervision behavior: The role of supervisor power and subordinate self-esteem. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 11, 5-10.

Volume 11 Issue 2 | e408 | Published: August 1983 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1983.11.2.5

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Following Social Learning Theory, it was hypothesized that subordinate perceptions of their supervisor's reward, coercive, and expert power should relate to the degree of modeling for subordinates high in self-esteem (SE), but not for subordinates low in SE. Correspondingly, perceptions of supervisor's referent power should relate to modeling for those low in SE, but not those high in SE. Respondents were 66 department heads and their immediate supervisors, the branch managers, from an Israeli banking organization. Manager-department head similarity in self-described leadership behavior was used as the index of modeling. The over-all pattern of results largely supported the applicability of Social Learning Theory to organizational modeling.
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