The effects of similarity and actual levels of self-disclosure and self-disclosure flexibility on perceptions of interpersonal attraction and adjustment

Paul C. Winum1, Paul G. Banikiotes2
1University of Notre Dame, United States
2Advanced Resource Development Corporation, United States
Cite this article:  Winum, P. C., & Banikiotes, P. G. (1983). The effects of similarity and actual levels of self-disclosure and self-disclosure flexibility on perceptions of interpersonal attraction and adjustment. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 11, 17-22.

Volume 11 Issue 2 | e403 | Published: August 1983 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1983.11.2.17

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Fifty-two subjects, high or low in levels of self-disclosure and disclosure flexibility, were selected (from a larger sample of 139) to test the effects of similarity and actual levels of disclosure and disclosure flexibility on perceptions of interpersonal attraction and social adjustment. Subjects rated protocols contrived to be similar/dissimilar in disclosure and in disclosure flexibility levels to that of the subject. Results generally confirmed the hypotheses and found: 1) a similarity effect for disclosure flexibility: 2) highest adjustment ratings for medium-high disclosure and high disclosure flexibility protocols 3) actual disclosure level as a more potent determinant of perceived adjustment and attraction than was similarity in disclosure level: and 4) no discrimination of judgments by individuals low in disclosure flexibility.
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