The effects of sex and machiavellianism on self-disclosure patterns

Eva C. Brown1, Rebecca Guy1
1Memphis State University, United States
Cite this article:  Brown, E. C., & Guy, R. (1983). The effects of sex and machiavellianism on self-disclosure patterns. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 11, 93-96.

Volume 11 Issue 1 | e392 | Published: February 1983 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1983.11.1.93

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This study was aimed at replicating the findings of an earlier study examining the effects of sex and machiavellianism on self-disclosure patterns. Of particular interest was the question of whether or not a significant sex-machiavellian interaction would reoccur. A sample of 166 males and females recruited from the introductory course in sociology were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing several dimensions of friendship relations. Measures of self-disclosure and machiavellianism were included in the questionnaire. As hypothesised, a significant sex-machiavellian interaction was observed. The significant interaction was interpreted to suggest that self-disclosure may be a manipulation strategy for females. If this is the case, current measures of machiavellianism are intensitive to the range of manipulative techniques used by females.
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