Peer attachment and loneliness among adolescents who are deaf: The moderating effect of personality

Aitao Lu1, Yanping Yu1, Xiuxiu Hong1, Yi Feng1, Haiping Tian1, Jianhua Liao2
1Center for Studies of Psychological Application and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, and Guangdong Center of Mental Assistance and Contingency Technique for Emergency, People’s Republic of China
2Dongguan Qizhi Special Education School, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Lu, A., Yu, Y., Hong, X., Feng, Y., Tian, H., & Liao, J. (2014). Peer attachment and loneliness among adolescents who are deaf: The moderating effect of personality. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 42(4), 551-560.

Volume 42 Issue 4 | e3700 | Published: May 2014 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2014.42.4.551

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We conducted a study to explore whether or not 3 of the Big Five personality traits – namely, extraversion, neuroticism, and psychoticism – moderated the effects of peer attachment on loneliness among a group of adolescents who were deaf. The participants were 98 Chinese adolescents who were pupils at 5 special schools for those who are deaf. They completed anonymous questionnaires regarding peer attachment (the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment-Revised), personality (the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire), and loneliness (the Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Questionnaire). The results showed that extraversion moderated the relationship between peer attachment and loneliness, but neither neuroticism nor psychoticism had a moderating effect. Specifically, peer attachment predicted loneliness more strongly for highly extraverted adolescents than for their introverted peers. These findings illustrate that the effects of peer attachment on a subjective mental state varied considerably across this group of adolescents who were deaf, depending on the level of extraversion of each individual.

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