Sociological conceptions of personality

Joseph Ventimiglia1, Gordon J. Di Renzo2
1Memphis State University, United States
2University of Delaware, United States
Cite this article:  Ventimiglia, J., & Di Renzo, G. J. (1982). Sociological conceptions of personality. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 10(1), 25-38.

Volume 10 Issue 1 | e362 | Published: February 1982 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1982.10.1.25

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Sociological conceptions of personality are identified and synthesized by means of a number of propositions derived from definitional and theoretical themes in the literature. These propositions are tested in content analyses of references to personality found in textbooks of introductory sociology. Questions addressed include the extent to which personality lies within the domain of sociology, the degree of conceptual consensus, and the distinctiveness of sociological approaches to personality. Is there a good fit between expected and observed conceptions? The answers are in the main negative. It is suggested that the trait-bound conception of personality has diffused from classical personology to sociology and that conceptions of personality within sociology remain quite traditional in this and other respects. Conclusions of the study assess the implications for the field of sociology of personality as well as for the status of personality in sociology more broadly.
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