The role of depression and sex differences in attributions related to problematic social situations

James F. Calhoun1, Rafael Paralade1, Robert Moss1
1University of Georgia, United States
Cite this article:  Calhoun, J. F., Paralade, R., & Moss, R. (1982). The role of depression and sex differences in attributions related to problematic social situations. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 10(1), 73-76.

Volume 10 Issue 1 | e355 | Published: February 1982 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1982.10.1.73

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The present study was designed to evaluate the hypothesis that a group of depressed subjects would tend to make more internal and stable attributions of causality in potentially problematic social situations than would a group of nondepressed subjects. A group of 215 undergraduate psychology students were divided into depressed (n = 30) and nondepressed (n = 185) groups on the basis of the results on the Beck Depression Inventory. Each subject was presented a series of 12 brief vignettes depicting potentially problematic social situations. After reading each vignette, subjects rated them as to internal/external causality and along a stable/unstable dimension. Although the results provide support for the hypothesis, the need to replicate the findings with non-student populations was emphasized prior to generalizing the results to more general depressive populations.
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