The appropriateness of situational disclosures and the perceptions of interpersonal attraction and adjustment

Paul C. Winum1, Paul G. Banikiotes1, Greg J. Neimeyer1
1University of Notre Dame, United States
Cite this article:  Winum, P. C., Banikiotes, P. G., & Neimeyer, G. J. (1982). The appropriateness of situational disclosures and the perceptions of interpersonal attraction and adjustment. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 10(1), 65-68.

Volume 10 Issue 1 | e353 | Published: February 1982 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1982.10.1.65

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As an elaboration of the concept of self-disclosure, self disclosure flexibility, defines as the modulation of disclosure in accordance with target and setting conditions, has been related to greater social perceptiveness and generally successful interpersonal functioning. The present study investigated the manner in which the appropriateness of self-disclosure related to the concept of disclosure flexibility. Subjects rated contrived protocols which varied disclosure appropriateness with respect to target and setting conditions. Significant main effects for target and setting disclosure appropriateness for both adjustment and attraction variables were observed. Results are interpreted as indicating that differential perceptions of self-disclosure are largely contingent on the appropriateness of the disclosure and not the flexibility per se. Implications of the study are discussed in terms of the current method of assessing self-disclosure flexibility.
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