Swimming upstream against the fundamental attribution error: Subjects' weak generalizations from the Darley and Batson Study

P. R. Pietromonaco1, Richard Nisbett1
1University of Michigan, United States
Cite this article:  Pietromonaco, P., & Nisbett, R. (1982). Swimming upstream against the fundamental attribution error: Subjects' weak generalizations from the Darley and Batson Study. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 10, 1-4.

Volume 10 Issue 1 | e346 | Published: February 1982 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1982.10.1.1

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Subjects read about the Darley and Batson findings that (a) the degree to which people were in a hurry strongly influenced the likelihood that they would help a person in need of aid, while (b) several personality variables studied failed to influence helping. In predicting helping rates for other, similar situations, informed subjects (a) estimated only somewhat less helping when the target individual was in a hurry than when he was not, and (b) continued to emphasize personality variables in their predictions about helping.
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