First impressions of talking rates in opposite-sex and same-sex interactions

Chris L. Kleinke1, Margi Lenga Kahn1, Tracy Beach Tully1
1Wheaton College, United States
Cite this article:  Kleinke, C. L., Lenga Kahn, M., & Tully, T. B. (1979). First impressions of talking rates in opposite-sex and same-sex interactions. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 7(1), 81-92.

Volume 7 Issue 1 | e249 | Published: February 1979 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1979.7.1.81

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Four experiments were conducted in which subjects evaluated people who talked 20, 50 or 80% of the time in opposite-sex or same-sex interactions. Multivariate analysis of results showed that first impressions of talking rate can be understood in terms of a "potency" dimension and a "liking" dimension. People who talked 80% of the time were evaluated as being domineering, outgoing, selfish, inconsiderate, inattentive, impolite, cold, and disliked by the other person. People talking 50% of the time were evaluated as being likeable, attentive, polite, and warm. People talking 20% of the time were evaluated as being submissive, introverted, unselfish and unintelligent. There was no interaction between speaker sex and amount of talking in opposite-sex dyads. Males in same-sex interactions were evaluated as being cold when they spoke 20% of the time and females in same-sex interactions were evaluated as being cold, inattentive, and intelligent when they spoke 80% of the time. Suggestions were given for an attributional study of talking rate.
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