On the use of single sentence descriptions of behavior in attribution research

Saul Kassin1, Charles A. Lowe1
1University of Connecticut, United States
Cite this article:  Kassin, S., & Lowe, C. A. (1979). On the use of single sentence descriptions of behavior in attribution research. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 7(1), 1-8.

Volume 7 Issue 1 | e239 | Published: February 1979 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1979.7.1.1

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgments
Author Contact
Previous studies employing attribution questionnaires have neglected important stimulus characteristics of single sentence descriptions of behavior. The present study investigated the effects of the consensus (high vs. low) and sentence structure (active vs. passive) of single sentence descriptions of different behaviors on causal attributions. As expected, high consensus produced less person attribution than did low consensus, and passive items produced more stimulus attribution than did active items. Implications for the epistemological status of previous questionnaire research on attributions and, in particular, previous results bearing on consensus and salience were discussed.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.