The influence of social class salience on self-assessed intelligence

Laura Kudrna1, Adrian Furnham2, Viren Swami3
1University of Westminster, United Kingdom
2University College London, United Kingdom
3University of Westminster, London, UK and Higher Education Learning Philosophy University College, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, United Kingdom
Cite this article:  Kudrna, L., Furnham, A., & Swami, V. (2010). The influence of social class salience on self-assessed intelligence. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 38, 859-864.

Volume 38 Issue 6 | e2033 | Published: July 2010 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2010.38.6.859

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Previous research on self-assessed intelligence (SAI) has been focused on sex differences to the exclusion of other pertinent factors, including objective and subjective social class differences. In this study, 343 participants completed an online questionnaire in which the salience of social class identity was manipulated and measures of self-assessed overall intelligence, participant sex, and objective and subjective social class status were obtained. Results showed that participants of a high social class had a significantly higher SAI when their social class identity was salient, but there was no significant difference in the SAI of low social class groups with or without their social class identity salient. Results also revealed significant sex differences in SAI, but only among participants of a high social class. Overall, these results suggest that social class salience may be an important factor in shaping SAI.

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