The relationship between self-compassion, self-efficacy, and control belief about learning in Turkish university students

Murat Iskender1
1Sakarya University, Turkey
Cite this article:  Iskender, M. (2009). The relationship between self-compassion, self-efficacy, and control belief about learning in Turkish university students. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 37, 711-720.

Volume 37 Issue 5 | e1882 | Published: June 2009 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2009.37.5.711

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In the present study, aims were (1) to determine gender differences in self-compassion, self-efficacy, and control belief for learning and (2) to examine the relationships between self-compassion, self-efficacy, and control belief for learning. Participants were 390 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Self-Compassion Scale, the Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Control Belief for Learning Scale. Results showed that there were no significant gender differences in self-compassion, self-efficacy, and control belief for learning. In correlation analysis, self-kindness correlated positively with self-efficacy and control belief for learning; self-judgment had a negative correlation with self-efficacy. Awareness of common humanity had positive correlations with self-efficacy and control belief for learning, and had negative correlations with self-judgment. On the other hand, isolation was associated negatively with self-efficacy and self-kindness, and positively with self-judgment. Mindfulness related positively to self-efficacy, and control belief for learning, and it was negatively related to self-judgment and isolation. Finally, it was found that over-identification had a negative correlation with self-efficacy and self-kindness, but positive correlations with self-judgment and isolation.

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