The effects of an emotional intelligence skills training program on the consistent anger levels of Turkish university students

Muge Yilmaz1
1Ondokuz Mayis University, Trinidad and Tobago
Cite this article:  Yilmaz, M. (2009). The effects of an emotional intelligence skills training program on the consistent anger levels of Turkish university students. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 37(4), 565-576.

Volume 37 Issue 4 | e1863 | Published: May 2009 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2009.37.4.565

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The effect of an emotional intelligence skill training program on the levels of consistent anger of university students was investigated in 32 volunteers. A pretest, posttest model with a control group as study design was used and 16 individuals made up the study group and 16 individuals were in the control group. Levels of consistent anger were assessed by the State Trait Anger Scale (Spielberger, Jacobs, Russell, & Crane, 1983, adapted by Özer, 1994). In the data analysis, Mann-Whitney U Test, Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs Signed Ranks Test, and One-Way ANOVA for Repeated Measures were used. Results indicate that the level of consistent anger of those who attended the 12-session emotional intelligence skill training program was lower than for those who did not attend this program (p < .001). In the follow-up study conducted 3 months later with the study group, there was no significant difference between consistent anger posttest scores and follow-up test scores. The data gathered indicate that an emotional intelligence skill training program may lower the levels of consistent anger for university students. Students whose consistent anger level is high would benefit from psychological counseling.

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