Self-concept and dangerous driving proclivity in male and female Israeli drivers

Tova Rosenbloom1, Adar Ben-Eliyahu2, Dan Nemrodov2
1The Phoenix Road Safety Studies, Bar Ilan University, and Research Institute of Human Factors in Road Safety, Academic Studies, Israel
2Research Institute of Human Factors in Road Safety, Academic Studies, Israel
Cite this article:  Rosenbloom, T., Ben-Eliyahu, A., & Nemrodov, D. (2009). Self-concept and dangerous driving proclivity in male and female Israeli drivers. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 37(4), 539-544.

Volume 37 Issue 4 | e1855 | Published: May 2009 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2009.37.4.539

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The aim of this paper was to see whether there is an association between drivers’ self-concept, gender, and proclivity for dangerous driving. Participants’ self-concept was measured using the brief Hebrew version of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS; Fitts, 1965). Tendency to commit traffic violations and to engage in dangerous driving was assessed using the Dangerous Driving Questionnaire (DDQ; Berger, 1995). The regression analysis showed that out of all TSCS scales only moral self-concept correlated significantly with general dangerous driving. In addition, ANOVA revealed that male drivers and drivers with low self-concept report more dangerous driving than do females and drivers with high self-concept, correspondingly. Results give evidence in favor of a hypothesis that low self-concept is connected to dangerous driving.

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