Sex differences in spatial visualization of Kuwaiti school children

Bader M. Alansari1, Jan B. Deregowski2, Peter McGeorge2
1Kuwait University, Kuwait
2University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Cite this article:  Alansari, B. M., Deregowski, J. B., & McGeorge, P. (2008). Sex differences in spatial visualization of Kuwaiti school children. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 36(6), 811-824.

Volume 36 Issue 6 | e1756 | Published: July 2008 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2008.36.6.811

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Current published data on sex differences in spatial perception is inconclusive. In particular, there are no convincing data on the spatial visualization skills of young children; consequently, it is thought that such differences may be absent. This study was conducted to investigate sex differences in spatial visualization in a sample of Kuwaiti school children. Two hundred and thirty-five pupils (109 boys and 126 girls) aged from 5 to 9 years participated in the study. Experimental stimuli were used as a spatial visualization test. The data clearly showed that boys performed better than girls on the spatial visualization test. Their superiority resulted from a greater facility to encode shapes in general, rather than from a greater facility to specifically encode shapes in the orientations in which they were presented.

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