Perceived stress, self-efficacy and its relations to psychological well-being status in Iranian male high school students

Babak Moeini1, Froug Shafii2, Alireza Hidarnia3, Gholam Reza Babaii3, Behrooz Birashk4, Hamid Allahverdipour1
1Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Iran
2Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
3Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
4Iran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
Cite this article:  Moeini, B., Shafii, F., Hidarnia, A., Babaii, G. R., Birashk, B., & Allahverdipour, H. (2008). Perceived stress, self-efficacy and its relations to psychological well-being status in Iranian male high school students. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 36(2), 257-266.

Volume 36 Issue 2 | e1689 | Published: March 2008 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2008.36.2.257

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Psychological stress has been found to be associated with a variety of ailments and health outcomes in adolescents. This study investigated the relationships between perceived stress, general self-efficacy and mental health status among Iranian male adolescents recruited from midtown high schools in Tehran who studied in 12th grade (N = 148). Pupils completed three questionnaires for assessing perceived stress (PSS-14; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983), general self-efficacy (GSE; Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1995) and psychological well-being (GHQ-28; Goldberg & Hillier, 1979). Statistical analysis revealed that greater stress was associated with lower general self-efficacy and lower mental health status. A significant inverse relationship between self-efficacy and general health was found among these students. Results are discussed in relation to their implications for effective mental health education (e.g., stress management training) for adolescents.

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