Latent class analysis of risk behaviors among Bahamian young adolescents: Relationship between values prioritization and latent class

Matthew Cole1, Bonita Stanton2, Linette Deveaux3, Carole Harris4, Sonya Lunn3, Lesley Cottrell4, Rebecca Clemens2, Xiaoming Li2, Sharon Marshall2, Rosa Mae Baine3
1Lawrence Technological University, United States
2Wayne State University, United States
3Ministry of Health, Bahamas
4West Virginia University, United States
Cite this article:  Cole, M., Stanton, B., Deveaux, L., Harris, C., Lunn, S., Cottrell, L., Clemens, R., Li, X., Marshall, S., & Baine, R. (2007). Latent class analysis of risk behaviors among Bahamian young adolescents: Relationship between values prioritization and latent class. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 35, 1061-1076.

Volume 35 Issue 8 | e1639 | Published: September 2007 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2007.35.8.1061

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To explore an association between values and risk behaviors among early adolescents, baseline data from 689 Bahamian youth (median age = 10) were collected from the Portrait Values Questionnaire (Schwartz et al., 2001) and The Bahamian Youth Health Risk Behavioral Inventory. Latent class analysis identified three classes of youth in differing patterns of risk behavior: (7.8%) high levels of drug and delinquency risk behaviors; (2.8%) high levels of sexual risk behavior; (89.4%) low risk takers. Results showed low risk takers included more females, while at least twice as many males comprised the two risk behavior classes. ANOVA found Benevolence, Conformity, Security, Tradition and Universalism values were associated with low risk takers, and logistic regressions for ordered categorical (ordinal) dependent variables showed both values and latent class predicted intentions for future risk behavior. Latent class analysis and values assessment are discussed as tools to guide adolescent risk-reduction interventions.
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