An investigation of the influences of job autonomy and neuroticism on job stressor-strain relations

Wei-Tao Tai1, Shih-Chen Liu2
1Chihlee Institute of Technology, Taiwan
2University of La Verne, United States
Cite this article:  Tai, W., & Liu, S. (2007). An investigation of the influences of job autonomy and neuroticism on job stressor-strain relations. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 35, 1007-1020.

Volume 35 Issue 8 | e1632 | Published: September 2007 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2007.35.8.1007

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The impact of job autonomy and traits (i.e., neuroticism) on job stressor-strain relations was examined. Data were collected from 311 first-line employees and supervisors belonging to the service department of 42 enterprises. The results showed that low neuroticism negatively related with hindrance stressors, emotional exhaustion and disengagement. In addition, challenge stressors positively impacted employees’ emotional exhaustion and negatively influenced employees’ disengagement. However, hindrance stressors positively increased both the emotional exhaustion and disengagement of employees. Finally, results showed 3- way interactions among neuroticism, job autonomy, and stressors on strains. As predicted, the interaction of neuroticism and job autonomy moderated the relationships between challenge stressors and two strains (i.e., emotional exhaustion and disengagement), and the relationships between hindrance stressors and disengagement. Future research directions on the topic and practical implications of results are discussed.
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