Perceived parenting styles and disordered personality traits in adolescent and adult students and in personality disorder patients

Rongrong Yu1, Zhi Wang2, Fuyong Qian3, Kerry L. Jang4, W. John Livesley4, Joel Paris5, Mowei Shen1, Wei Wang1
1Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China
2Capital Normal University, People’s Republic of China
3Department of Education, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China
4University of British Columbia, Canada
5McGill University, Canada
Cite this article:  Yu, R., Wang, Z., Qian, F., Jang, K., Livesley, W., Paris, J., Shen, M., & Wang, W. (2007). Perceived parenting styles and disordered personality traits in adolescent and adult students and in personality disorder patients. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 35, 587-598.

Volume 35 Issue 5 | e1598 | Published: June 2007 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2007.35.5.587

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact
To examine the relationship between perceptions of parenting and personality, the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI; Parker, Tupling, & Brown, 1979) and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology - Basic Questionnaire (DAPP; Livesley & Jackson, in press) were administered to 167 adolescent and 422 adult students, as well as to 198 patients with personality disorders. Principal component analysis of the PBI yielded 3 factors in all three samples: Care, Freedom Control, and Autonomy Denial. Chinese personality disorder patients perceived less parental Care than did adolescent and adult students, more paternal Freedom Control than did adults, and more paternal Autonomy Denial than did adolescents. Most regression coefficients between PBI and DAPP scales were moderate, but consistent with previous literature. These findings are similar to those found in the non-Chinese samples, suggesting that parental bonding is important in the development of personality disorders across different nations.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.