Construction and validation of an Animal-Human Continuity Scale

Donald I. Templer1, Heather Joy Connelly1, Lynette Bassman1, Jessica Hart1
1California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, United States
Cite this article:  Templer, D. I., Connelly, H. J., Bassman, L., & Hart, J. (2006). Construction and validation of an Animal-Human Continuity Scale. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 34(7), 769-776.

Volume 34 Issue 7 | e1513 | Published: August 2006 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2006.34.7.769

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A 12-item Animal-Human Continuity Scale with a Likert-type 7-option format was constructed to measure the extent to which the respondent views humans and animals in a dichotomous fashion vs. on a continuum. After the generation of items on a rational basis, item selection was based on ratings of content validity followed by item-total score correlation based on a sample of 88 graduate students, faculty and university staff participants. The scale contained such items as “Humans can think but animals cannot”, “People evolved from lower animals”, and “People have a spiritual nature but animals do not”. A Cronbach’s alpha of .69 was obtained. The scale yielded three factors – “rational capacity”, “superiority vs. equality”, and “evolutionary continuum”. More traditionally religious participants tended to respond in the dichotomous direction. In another validation project a significant difference in the expected direction was found for participants from a Unitarian Universalist church (in the continuous direction) and a conservative Methodist church (dichotomous direction). Implications for the use of this instrument in the measurement of individual differences are discussed.

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