A longitudinal study of the relationship between positive affect and both problem- and emotion-focused coping strategies

Katsuyuki Yamasaki1, Akiko Sakai2, Kanako Uchida3
1Naruto University of Education, Japan
2Mimasaka College, Japan
3Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Japan
Cite this article:  Yamasaki, K., Sakai, A., & Uchida, K. (2006). A longitudinal study of the relationship between positive affect and both problem- and emotion-focused coping strategies. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 34, 499-510.

Volume 34 Issue 5 | e1493 | Published: June 2006 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2006.34.5.499

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The relationship between positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA) and reported use of problem-focused or emotion-focused coping strategies was investigated in a longitudinal study. Japanese undergraduates (200 men and 270 women) completed a version of the PANAS (Watson, Clark, and Tellegen, 1988) and the situational version of the General Coping Questionnaire (Sasaki and Yamasaki, 2004). These two measures were administered twice, five weeks apart (T1 and T2). The results showed some significant sex differences. Higher PA at T1 was associated with greater reported use of cognitive reinterpretation as a coping strategy at T2 only for men, whereas greater use of cognitive reinterpretation at T1 was associated with higher PA at T2 only for women. These results suggest that there is no mutually reciprocal relationship between PA and use of cognitive reinterpretation as a coping strategy.

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