Self-discrepancies and negative affect: The moderating roles of private and public self-consciousness

Paul M. Fromson1
1Department of Psychology, Elon University, United States
Cite this article:  Fromson, P. M. (2006). Self-discrepancies and negative affect: The moderating roles of private and public self-consciousness. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 34(4), 333-350.

Volume 34 Issue 4 | e1479 | Published: May 2006 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2006.34.4.333

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Although distinct self-discrepancies are theoretically associated with distinct emotional states, empirical support has been inconsistent. In this study I explored the moderating impact of self-consciousness on the relationship between self-discrepancies and emotion. Discrepancies must not only exist, but must also be accessed to have their presumed consequences. Thus, individuals dispositionally prone to focus attention upon the self should evidence a stronger relationship between specific self-discrepancies and theorized emotions. Participants were assessed on self-discrepancies, on private and public self-consciousness, and on levels of negative affect. Correlations between specific self-discrepancies and theorized emotions were significantly stronger among individuals scoring higher on private self-consciousness. However, the degree to which discrepancies evoke distinct emotions was called into question. Finally, public self-consciousness was not found to play a moderating role.

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