Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription or Fee Access

Effects of Perceived Selection Ratio on personality test faking

Chet Robie (Wilfrid Laurier University)
Cite this article:  Robie, C. (2006). Effects of Perceived Selection Ratio on personality test faking. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 34, 1233-1244.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2006.34.10.1233
Publication date: November 2006

Abstract


Researchers have not investigated the degree to which perceived selection ratio may affect faking on personality inventories. In this study, 2 personality inventories that differed in item subtlety were administered to 150 undergraduate students. Half of the students were administered a personality inventory with more obvious items (n = 75) and half of the students were administered a personality inventory with more subtle items (n = 75). For each personality inventory, 25 students were randomly assigned to each of the following experimental conditions which included financial incentives to mirror the real-world motivational processes underlying desire for the job: (1) low perceived selection ratio; (2) moderate perceived selection ratio; and (3) high perceived selection ratio. Results showed no statistically significant mean differences between personality scale scores across levels of perceived selection ratios for each personality inventory. 

Full Text: PDF  pp. 1233-1244