Predicting the risk for aggression in the workplace: Risk factors, self-esteem and time at work

Steve Harvey1, Loraleigh Keashley2
1Bishop's University, Canada
2Wayne State University, United States
Cite this article:  Harvey, S. , & Keashley, L. (2003). Predicting the risk for aggression in the workplace: Risk factors, self-esteem and time at work. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 31, 807-814.

Volume 31 Issue 8 | e1295 | Published: December 2003 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2003.31.8.807

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Time spent at work was examined as a predictor of aggression experienced in the workplace relative to identifiable job risk factors and victim characteristics (i.e., self-esteem). Based on past research, it was expected that job risk factors and self-esteem would predict aggression experienced at work. The expectation that time spent at work predicts aggression in addition to these variables is premised on the assumption that increased "exposure" time increases the probability of being victimized. 115 students completed a survey on the aggression they experienced from others over the course of summer employment. A hierarchical regression analysis provided support for all propositions. Aggression experienced at work was significantly predicted by job risk factors, the target's self-esteem, and the number of hours worked per week, with the latter contributing an 8% increment in predicted variance.


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