The effects of evaluative context on performance: The roles of social and self-evaluations

Robert J. Parker1
1University of South Florida, United States
Cite this article:  Parker, R. J. (2001). The effects of evaluative context on performance: The roles of social and self-evaluations. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 29(8), 807-822.

Volume 29 Issue 8 | e1130 | Published: December 2001 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2001.29.8.807

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In this study it was proposed that evaluative situations influence individual performance by raising concerns about self- and social evaluations. When an individual performs a task, the individual’s performance may be subject to 2 types of evaluation: self-evaluation and evaluation by others. Often, the basis of evaluation is the performance of others, i.e., social comparison. In such cases, an individual may increase performance to protect self- and social-esteem. Further, the individual’s sensitivity to esteem threats, as measured by identity orientation, may moderate the performance increase. In this study performance was examined in 2 evaluative situations: peer groups and goal setting. Experimental results support the proposed theory in the case of peer evaluations. Regarding goals, results suggest that self-evaluation may not contribute to performance increases associated with goal setting.

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