The incidence and belief structures associated with breast self-examination

Lucy Ashton1, Wally Karnilowicz1, Debbie Fooks1
1Victoria University of Technology, Australia
Cite this article:  Ashton, L., Karnilowicz, W., & Fooks, D. (2001). The incidence and belief structures associated with breast self-examination. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 29(3), 223-230.

Volume 29 Issue 3 | e1079 | Published: May 2001 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2001.29.3.223

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We investigated the frequency of breast self-examination (BSE) and components underlying compliance or non-compliance using the Health Belief Model (HBM) adapted by Champion (1993). The 87 Australian participants were women aged between 18 and 64, with a mean age of 34 years. The research hypotheses were supported and are consistent with previous research findings using American participants. Using multiple regression, the overall model of the HBM variables and the frequency of BSE were significant (F(6,80) = 13.3443, p < .0001), indicating that frequency of BSE is significantly related to perception of seriousness of the disease, confidence in performing BSE, perception of susceptibility to breast cancer, the benefits of – and barriers to – performing BSE, and level of health motivation. Perceived confidence in performing BSE and perception of personal susceptibility to breast cancer were most strongly related to frequency of BSE and accounted for a significant amount of the variance of the HBM.

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