Self-reported attachment style, anxiety, and depression in children

Peter Muris1, Birgit Mayer2, Cor Meesters1
1Maastricht University, Netherlands
2Open University, Netherlands
Cite this article:  Muris, P., Mayer, B., & Meesters, C. (2000). Self-reported attachment style, anxiety, and depression in children. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 28(2), 157-162.

Volume 28 Issue 2 | e1011 | Published: April 2000 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2000.28.2.157

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We explored the relationship between self-reported attachment styles and levels of anxiety symptoms and depression in a sample of 12-year-old children. Participants completed a simplified version of Hazan and Shaver’s (1987) single-item measure of attachment style and self-report measures of anxiety and depression. Results showed that 20.9% of the children classified themselves as insecurely (i.e., avoidantly or ambivalently) attached. Furthermore, it was found that insecurely attached children had elevated levels of anxiety symptoms and depression compared to securely attached children.

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