Validation of the Harter Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance with Lebanese children

Karma El Hassan1
1American University of Beirut, Lebanon
Cite this article:  El Hassan, K. (1999). Validation of the Harter Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance with Lebanese children. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 27(4), 339-354.

Volume 27 Issue 4 | e985 | Published: August 1999 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1999.27.4.339

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This study was aimed at validating the use of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance (PSPCSA) with Lebanese kindergarten children. The scale was administered to 152 children, their responses were analyzed, sex differences were studied, and the reliability and validity of the scale were investigated. The findings provided partial support for the use of the PSPCSA with Lebanese children. Responses showed a pattern somewhat similar to that reported in US research. Kindergartners had highly-inflated ratings which were higher than those of their teachers. Except for the maternal scale, subscales intercorrelated moderately with each other, also the reliability coefficients were good and comparable to those obtained by Harter. With respect to predictive validity, self-concept scores correlated only with achievement in the social domain and not with academic achievement. Factor analysis revealed a 2-factor model made up of a large competence factor which included cognitive and physical competence and peer relations, and a small maternal acceptance factor. There were differences in the findings due to cultural influences. Implications were discussed and future research directions were outlined.


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