Using an eye tracker to measure information processing according to need for cognition level

Di Wu1, Yuntao Gao1, Danmin Miao1
1Department of Psychology, The Fourth Military Medical University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Wu, D., Gao, Y., & Miao, D. (2018). Using an eye tracker to measure information processing according to need for cognition level. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 46(11), 1869-1880.

Volume 46 Issue 11 | e7316 | Published: November 2018 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.7316

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact

The need for cognition (NC) refers to the tendency for people to vary in the extent to which they engage in, and enjoy, cognitively effortful activities. However, few studies on NC have been conducted to investigate cognitive processes by using eye-tracking technology. Thus, we measured differences in eye movement between individuals high versus low in NC. We presented 43 undergraduates with persuasive messages on postponed retirement. Meanwhile, their eye movements were recorded using eye-tracking technology. Additionally, participants completed measures of attitude and recall of arguments. Our findings showed that participants high in NC recalled more arguments but did not form more favorable attitudes than did those low in NC. Furthermore, compared to those low in NC, those with high NC recorded longer eye fixation duration, more fixations, slower reading speed, and shorter saccade (movement) lengths. Finally, there were no differences between the two groups concerning the distribution (short, medium, and long fixations) and the proportion of regressions. Eye-tracking technology contributes to further understanding of characteristics of individuals high versus low in NC during reading.

Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.