Videogames, aggression, and self-esteem: A survey

Sheila Fling1, L. Smith1, T. Rodriguez1, D. Thornton1, Eric Atkins1, K. Nixon1
1Southwest Texas State University, United States
Cite this article:  Fling, S., Smith, L., Rodriguez, T., Thornton, D., Atkins, E., & Nixon, K. (1992). Videogames, aggression, and self-esteem: A survey. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 20(1), 39-46.

Volume 20 Issue 1 | e667 | Published: February 1992 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1992.20.1.39

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A survey was administered to 153 sixth through twelfth graders, including items on videogame play plus self-esteem and aggression scales. Teachers also rated the children on self-esteem and aggression. Amount of videogame play was found to correlate with aggression but not with self-esteem. About 4,796 of the sample said some videogames might foster anger or aggression. Results also indicated that boys play videogames more than girls and are more aggressive than girls. Self-esteem and aggression were positively correlated on teacher ratings but negatively on self-ratings.


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