Aggression differences among nonoffender, onset-offender, and recidivist migrant youth in China

Xiaodan Xie1, Qiang Zhou1, Li Chen1, Bing Feng2, Changwei Ji3, Wenxiu Geng4, Xinchao Zhou5
1Department of Psychology, Wenzhou Medical University, People’s Republic of China
2School of Basic Medical Sciences, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, People’s Republic of China
3The People’s Procuratorate of Longwan District, People’s Republic of China
4School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, People’s Republic of China
5Department of Information, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Xie, X., Zhou, Q., Chen, L., Feng, B., Ji, C., Geng, W., & Zhou, X. (2017). Aggression differences among nonoffender, onset-offender, and recidivist migrant youth in China. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 45(4), 605-616.

Volume 45 Issue 4 | e5981 | Published: May 2017 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.5981

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We examined aggression differences among nonoffender, onset-offender, and recidivist migrant youth in China using explicit and implicit measures. From 2011 to 2015, data were collected via face-to-face surveys and the Implicit Association Test (IAT). Male migrant youth (N = 227; 106 nonoffenders, 78 onset-offenders, and 43 recidivists) completed the Chinese version of the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire, and 125 male migrant youth (68 nonoffenders, 31 onset-offenders, and 26 recidivists) performed two IATs assessing implicit attitudes and implicit self-concepts about aggression. The results showed that the IAT was reliable in an Asian context with offenders, and that the onset-offenders demonstrated greater aggression compared with those in the recidivist and nonoffender groups. Our findings suggest that onset-offenders may have more accurate self-awareness than do recidivists and incarceration may influence attitudes toward aggression in a positive way. Such knowledge is important for interventions that target juvenile delinquency.

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